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Archive for the ‘Tips and Tricks’ Category

Have you signed up for the OneNote 2010 beta yet?

A first look at Microsoft OneNote 2010

If not, visit http://www.microsoft.com/2010 to download the Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus Beta.

Here to tempt you is a description of how you will be sharing Notebooks in Office 2010:

In Microsoft OneNote 2010 Beta, you can share any notebook so that you can access it on other computers or on the Web, or so that you can work in it together with other people. As a collaborative tool, OneNote offers far more than the ability to send static notebook pages via e-mail. Depending on the nature of your projects, you can use OneNote to brainstorm together with other people in meetings, use the notebook pages as a virtual whiteboard, and set up shared notebooks in which everyone can view, add, and edit information.

Unlike other programs that lock files for editing by one person at a time, OneNote 2010 lets multiple authors access a shared notebook at the same time. Anytime someone edits to the pages and sections in the shared notebook, OneNote automatically synchronizes the changes so that the notebook is always up-to-date for everyone. OneNote also maintains a separate offline copy of the notes on each user’s computer. That way, shared note-taking participants can continue to edit the notes locally even when they are temporarily disconnected from the network. The next time they connect to the shared notebook, OneNote automatically merges their changes with the changes made by everyone else.

Create a new shared notebook

  1. On the File menu, click New.
  2. Under Store Notebook On, choose where the new notebook should be stored:

    Click Web if you want to be able to use the notebook from any computer or from a Web browser. You will need to sign in or sign up for an account, after which you can control whether your notebook can be accessed only by you or also by other people.

    Click Network if you want to share the new notebook with other people on the same computer network or on a SharePoint site (for example, at your work or at your school).

  3. In the Name box, enter a descriptive title for the subject of the new notebook (for example, Team Notebook).
  4. In the Web Location or Network Location field, do one of the following:

    Specify a Web Location If the Web service is available, sign in with an existing account (such as Windows Live) or sign up for a new one. When you are signed in, you will see a list of your Web folders where you can create shared notebooks. If you don’t need to share with other people, select one of the Personal Folders. If you do need to share with others, select a Shared Folder to which others will have access. To set sharing permissions for new and existing folders, OneNote will launch your Web browser, where you can finish creating the new folder for your notebook. Return to OneNote and then refresh the folder list in the Web Location field to see the folder that you just created. Now select this folder and then proceed to Step 5 below.

    Specify a Network Location You can enter the full path of a network file share, enter a mapped network drive, or paste the full address of a SharePoint document library where you want to create the shared notebook. You can also select from one of the recent SharePoint locations, if available. Note that the notebook will be accessible to anybody who has permissions to this network location or SharePoint site.

  5. Click Create Notebook.

Share an existing notebook

  1. On the File menu, click Share.
  2. Under Select Notebook, select an existing notebook that you want to share with other people or between other computers that you will be using.
  3. Under Share On, choose where the notebook should be shared:Click Web if you want to be able to use the notebook from any computer or from a Web browser. You will need to sign in or sign up for an account, after which you can control whether your notebook can be accessed only by you or also by other people.

    Click Network if you want to share the new notebook with other people on the same computer network or on a SharePoint site (for example, at your work or at your school).

  4. In the Web Location or Network Location field, do one of the following:

    Specify a Web Location If the Web service is available, sign in with an existing account (such as Windows Live) or sign up for a new one. When you are signed in, you will see a list of your Web folders where you can create shared notebooks. If you don’t need to share with other people, select one of the Personal Folders. If you do need to share with others, select a Shared Folder to which others will have access. To set sharing permissions for new and existing folders, OneNote will launch your Web browser, where you can finish creating the new folder for your notebook. Return to OneNote and then refresh the folder list in the Web Location field to see the folder that you just created. Now select this folder and then proceed to Step 5 below.

    Specify a Network Location You can enter the full path of a network file share, enter a mapped network drive, or paste the full address of a SharePoint document library where you want to create the shared notebook. You can also select from one of the recent SharePoint locations, if available. Note that the notebook will be accessible to anybody who has permissions to this network location or SharePoint site.

  5. Click Share Notebook.

Note: If a Web or Network location that you want to use is shown as unavailable, make sure you are connected to the Internet or your network and that you have the necessary permissions before attempting to save and use notebooks in such locations.

Create an e-mail message with a link to the shared notebook for yourself or others

After you create or share a notebook, OneNote will ask you if you want to create an e-mail message with a link to the shared notebook.

If you are sharing the notebook with other people, click E-mail a Link to compose the e-mail message for your recipients. This message will include a link to the shared notebook, which recipients can click to open the shared notebook on their computer.

Note: Mail recipients who do not already have permission to access the shared notebook location will not be able to use the shared notebook. The e-mail link only points to the location; it does not provide automatic access.

If you won’t be sharing your notebook with others but you want to use it on multiple computers, you can click E-mail a Link and then send the e-mail message with the link to your own Web-based e-mail account. This way, you can easily open the shared notebook from another computer.

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Here’s a review from webworkerdaily.com  of the OneNote 2010 beta as a blogging tool:

Now that Microsoft Office 2010 is in beta (as I noted here ), I’ve been spending more time using the applications, especially OneNote 2010 beta. have long used OneNote for capturing project information when I am working on one of my Windows machines, but its potential as a blogging tool has been on my mind recently. One of the features Microsoft ( GigaOM Pro company profile here ) touts I It makes a lot of sense, because OneNote can serve as an organizer for ideas, a repository for pictures and images, and has tools for composing text.

For purposes of this post, I created a fresh notebook in OneNote 2010 beta running on Windows 7. The publishing process from OneNote to your blog is straightforward. First you compose your post in OneNote and then choose “Send” from the “File” menu. Choose “Send to Blog.” If you haven’t used OneNote 2010 beta to publish to your blog previously, you’ll receive a prompt to set up a new blog account and then the New Blog Account dialog box appears.


The blogging feature supports Windows Live Spaces, Blogger, SharePoint blog, Microsoft Community Server, TypePad and WordPress. (Disclosure: Automatic, maker of WordPress, is backed by True Ventures, a venture capital firm that is an investor in the parent company of this blog, Giga Omni Media. Om Malik, founder of Giga Omni Media, is also a venture partner at True.) Follow the prompts to set up your new blog account. This is the only time you’ll have to set up your blog for publishing.

The post you composed in OneNote 2010 beta now appears in Word 2010 Beta. It can be easy to miss at first, but what you are actually seeing is Word with the “Blog Post” tab open. From this tab, you have options for publishing and inserting categories. I encourage you to test these features out prior to using them because I noticed some subtle differences between the options available for TypePad and WordPress.


When publishing to your blog, the following scary warning appears:

Whether you are comfortable with this or not, it’s certainly off-putting — I would like to know whether my password is being encrypted or not.

I was disappointed that the “Send to Blog” feature relies on MS Word for publishing my posts, because I was expecting a strictly OneNote-to-blog publishing experience. However, if you use OneNote to capture ideas and research information you may still get some mileage out of this feature. Personally, I probably won’t be using the feature on a regular basis because I think using two desktop applications just to compose and publish a blog post is a little too much, though it could be handy if I am writing posts based upon source material I already have in OneNote.

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Too Much of a Good Thing…

Another great post from ihearter Steve

I don’t know about you, but for me organizing is a challenge in part because I don’t maintain a single discipline about how I do it over time.  I get some pieces working, add others, read a good article and think “I should do that”, and next thing you know I’ve forgotten all about the basic steps that helped me improve in the first place.

This happens with OneNote too for me.  The ability to ‘TAG’ tasks to do is a great thing, AND I notice that the more I create lists, say for ‘home’, ‘critical tasks’ at work, other ‘tasks’ to be delegated or develop, I suddenly have 7 or 8 pages with things to do.

Here’s a capability of OneNote I’m learning can help.  Do a Tag summary page and see them all at once.

  • On the Command Menu, go to ‘Insert’ and the first choice, ‘Tag’.
  • On the ‘Tag’ submenu the first choice is ‘Show All Tagged Notes.’
  • Click that and it brings up a ‘Tags Summary’ sidebar that will let you see all your tasks, and group them by Section, Date, etc. You can show checked or unchecked.
  • And the really sweet tip here: At the bottom of the sidebar is a button that let’s you ‘Create Summary Page.’  Click that and it creates a page listing all your tagged tasks in the order you’ve chosen.
  • I title that with a date and time and print it out so I can see the various threads I’ve created.  I print it out on paper as a handy reminder, and then I go back and tidy things up.

This saves looking all over for things you wanted to remember at the time, but now have forgotten where the page went to.  You can also do this for items you’ve tagged as ‘Outlook Tasks.’  I don’t know about you, but for me this practice helps me find things before they’ve gone missing for too long.

I notice it actually does help me Get Things Done.

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I’m cold and soggy. That’s all I’m saying about that.

I’ve posted a couple of times about sharing OneNote notebooks on a server – but here, for the first time, is a link to a great demo that shows you exactly how to do that.

You will learn how to use a OneNote 2007 shared notebook as your brainstorming center, and your team-members can add ideas and play off each other’s thoughts…

See more OneNote 2007 demos at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/hel… Use a OneNote 2007 shared notebook as your brainstorming center, and your team-members can add ideas and play off each other’s thoughts no matter where they are.
Category:  Howto & Style

Watch it now

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Believe it or not, but there is a big yellow ball clearly visible in the sky over here in Seattle. Can it be true? Thank goodness I rode my bike to work today because these are the weather conditions that render Seattle-ites unable to drive more than 5 miles an hour:

1. Snow/hail/sleet etc

2. Rain (any amount)

3. Sun (they are blinded and perplexed)

Which means that it is only tolerable to be out in a car when it is overcast/cloudy – which, thankfully for us, tends to be most of the time between October and July. That’s a lot of time for people to stricken with SAD!

Anway, enough about that (by the way, talking about the weather is a legitimate topic of conversation here). For those of you who like short lists of tips, here are 6 simple OneNote tips I found on the Endless Scholar blog – pictures and all.

1. Insert Space to Widen the Page

You probably know you can make the page longer by inserting space, but did you know you can make the page wider by inserting space? Click the “Insert/Remove Space” button and move the cursor to the edge of the page. You should see the insert/remove line change to a vertical bar instead of horizontal.

Insert

2. Open the Pen Toolbar

The default OneNote set-up doesn’t have the pen toolbar exposed. The first thing I recommend for people with a Tablet PC to do is bring out the toolbar (View—>My Pens Toolbar) and find a nice home for it. You can even dock it on the bottom of the screen if that works best for you.

3. There are Lefty Settings!

For us poor lefty’s out there, forced to sit in awkward lecture seats, at least OneNote thought of us. In the Options panel, the Display category will have all you need to make OneNote lefty-friendly.

Lefty

4. Changing the Ink Color

In Journal, you can select a bit of ink and right-click to format the ink to a different color. This doesn’t work in OneNote, but don’t fret! Simply select the ink and select the desired color using the color wheel in the toolbar.

Colorwheel

5. Name Pages Faster

It’s probably the perfectionist in me poking through, but when I write out the title of a page, it’s not always recognized right away, or it’s recognized slightly wrong. A quick fix for this is to just ink the title, select the ink, and convert to text. You’ll quickly know if it’s right or if it needs tweaked to fit your exact naming scheme.

Titles

6. OneNote SideNote: Keep-Window-on-Top

If you haven’t enabled the OneNote SideNote, you should (Options Panel—>Other). This gives you instant access to a notepad with all the benefits of OneNote. My favorite way to use this is with the keep-window-on-top option. This should be default, but if it’s not, it’s the little push-pin on the top left corner. This is great for research, homework, or shopping lists ^_^.

Side

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Here’s something you may or may not already be doing -importing PowerPoint presentations into OneNote and then collaborating with your co-workers on the content.

Tom Bunzel from ITworld.com wrote this:

If you’re in IT, sooner or later you need to present to a team or get colleagues’ feedback on a project that inevitably is shown in PowerPoint format. If you don’t have SharePoint (or even if you do), it is frequently necessary to show your slides – and to practice your presentation and discuss what you are going to say – with your associates or your team. Clearly, this is true pretty much for anyone who uses PPT to communicate.

So what’s the best way to get the show in front of other people for their comments?

Sending your presentation to OneNote and beginning a shared session to discuss your slides and the project at hand is probably your fastest, most efficient course of action.

Microsoft OneNote, perhaps the most under-appreciated program in the Office suite, lets you organize and put comments into its Pages with relative ease. (If you think that OneNote is just for table computer users, you are missing the boat). OneNote installs a printer driver that you can access from PowerPoint to send your presentation directly to OneNote.

onenote

This is the easiest and fastest way to get your slides into OneNote.

In OneNote the slides go into a section for Unfiled Notes (you can move this Page to another Section to reorganize the content). If the slides are too large, zoom out or resize them.

The key here is that you can now open Live Sharing Section > Start Sharing Current Session under “Share”, and when you go through the short Wizard in the Task Pane, you can send the password and IP address to the shared session to others, who just need to open OneNote’s Join Sharing Session Task Pane, and enter the information to join the session. At this point all session members can annotate and comment on the presentation as it appears in OneNote on every session participant’s screen.

onenote

To discuss the various slides you would obviously use a telephone conference call, and this is a great scenario for getting instant feedback without having to email the presentation to other people, post it on a server, or go through a review process.

OneNote also interfaces really well with Outlook, so that you can easily assign Tasks from the shared OneNote session and have other team members be accountable for fulfilling them. And if you’ve loaded a series of presentations into OneNote, it’s easy to locate a specific slide using Search. OneNote 2007 also has a set of “Tags” that you can use or customize for quick reference to portions of your notes, including the slides from PowerPoint.

Just remember to use the Print capability within PowerPoint to send your slides directly to OneNote’s Unfiled Notes Section, and then start a new shared session, to easily collaborate on a PowerPoint presentation with colleagues or associates.

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Hey there OneNote lovers, there is a guy over at Microsoft who has a blog dedicated to providing tips and tricks on how to use OneNote. Sweet! You should check it out. I have also included a link to it on the resources page.  Here’s an example from the blog on how to use OneNote’s screen clipping feature (something I am a HUGE fan of)

  • Capture Screen Clippings.

It’s easy to capture a Screen Clipping in OneNote. This is essentially the same thing as taking a picture of what’s on your screen and storing it in OneNote. Then you can add your notations above, below, to the side or right on top of it.

This is useful for a number of reasons, but to put it into an easy-to-understand scenario, let’s say you’re a college student and are currently in a biology class. On the big screen, your professor navigates to an internet site that contains a picture of EscherichiaColi, also known as E. coli. He requests the students in the classroom who have computers to also navigate to the site. Then he begins explaining its genetic makeup.

After you navigate to the site, you open OneNote and take a Screen Clipping of the picture he’s explaining by clicking on the Insert menu, then on Screen Clipping and then you draw a rectangle around the picture. The picture appears on your page in OneNote and you begin taking notes, pointing your notes to the area of the picture he’s explaining. After the class is over, you head to your next class.

A few weeks later you’re preparing for a biology exam. You’re trying to remember some of the terms the professor used to describe E. coli. You open OneNote, type “E. coli” in the search box and just like that you’re taken to the notes you took on that day. Now you have all those notes and the picture you took from the Screen Clipping. What’s more, the internet address from which the clipping was captured appears beneath the picture so you can easily navigate back to it.

Tip: There are a few ways to capture a Screen Clipping:

  1. From the Insert menu in OneNote click Screen Clipping -> draw a rectangle around the area of the screen you wish to capture. Once you release the mouse button, the picture is dropped right into your OneNote page.
  2. Right-click on Side Note in your Windows System Tray -> Create Screen Clipping:

This will put you into Screen Clipping mode and you can draw a rectangle around the area of the screen you wish to capture.

  1. You can also press the Windows + S keys on your keyboard to activate the Screen Clipping feature.

Note that this will only work if you currently have Side Note running in your system tray:

Additional information: You can customize the Screen Clipping feature to do any of the following:

Copy the image to the clipboard only, (useful for when you want the picture to be dropped into another application).

This is done by right-clicking the Side Note icon in the Windows System Tray -> Options -> Screen Clipping Defaults -> Copy To Clipboard Only.

When this feature is enabled, it only works when capturing a Screen Clipping via the Side Note icon. When accessed through the Insert menu in OneNote, it places the picture on your page in OneNote in addition to copying it to the clipboard.

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