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Posts Tagged ‘drawing’

The leaves are starting to turn here in Seattle, which means it’s time for students to gear up for the new school year.  Clearly taking notes is a HUGE  part of being a student – so, I thought it may be time for a little note-taking 101 – OneNote-style.

Here are four ways you can improve your note-taking with OneNote:

Jotting phone numbers on scrap paper, writing addresses on sticky notes… These strategies may help in the moment, but what about when you need that information later? Or how about trying to decipher the notes that you scribbled in your binder during class? Imagine being able to grab all of your daily thoughts and sketches, keep them within reach at all times, and share them with others. You are well on your way to a clearer head when you open Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 on your Tablet PC and follow these four strategies: capture, organize, share, and enhance. With OneNote, you can capture almost anything: record an entire lecture for later review; create a diagram for your landscaper or teacher. And you can organize your thoughts and plans. Nothing gets lost—everything that you write is automatically and continuously saved.

Illustration of using OneNote to draw a landscape diagram
Using OneNote to draw a landscape diagram

OneNote is not just about organizing. Share any of your notes during your busy day, with coworkers, friends, family. Enhance the presentation of your thoughts and ideas: put them into action with pictures, sound, and video. Format them with professional style. And because of the auto save feature you should never lose a scribble! This article tells you how.

Capturing ideas

When OneNote is running, you can resize the OneNote window and place it anywhere you want on the screen. Just open a new page in OneNote and you’re ready to go. Your note pages can include text, pictures, graphics, sound, video, screen shots, documents, links, and web content.

  • Type text with the keyboard. Click anywhere on the note page and begin to type notes using the keyboard.
  • Enter text by using a tablet pen. Some people are scribblers, and prefer the freedom of jotting down notes. Need to write down a phone number? Just open OneNote and write it down freehand by using a pen. You can then change fonts, and format your text in whatever way you like.
  • Create diagrams. OneNote is perfect for doodlers, too. Illustrate your notes by using your pen to draw diagrams directly on the page. You can easily resize the diagrams, move them around on the page, and paste them in other notes or documents.
  • Add pictures. It’s easy to add pictures to your notes. You can copy pictures from the web, from other documents, or from your hard disk, and paste them anywhere on your note page. Here’s how to insert a picture:
  1. Place your cursor where you want the picture to appear on the page. If you are using a Tablet PC, make sure the selection cursor for your tablet pen is active by clicking the Type Text or Select Objects icon on the toolbar.
  2. On the Insert menu, point to Pictures, and then click From Files.
  3. Click the picture you want to insert, and then click Insert.

You can easily move the picture on the page or resize the picture by dragging it from any corner.

Illustration of using OneNote to organize research for a report
Using OneNote to organize research for a report

  • Include audio. With OneNote, you can record or import audio to store, edit, and include in your notes. You can record audio by using the built-in microphone on newer computers or by attaching an external microphone or other audio input device. Here’s how to record audio:
    • On the Insert menu, click Audio Recording.
  • Add video. Want to insert video into your notes? Just attach a video camera or a webcam to your computer to include moving footage and the sounds of any subject in your notes. You can play back a video that you made for class or record one to edit later. Here’s how to record video:
    • On the Insert menu, click Video Recording.
  • Import Excel lists. OneNote helps you keep track of numbers, too: you can import formatted lists from your Microsoft Office Excel files. Just copy columns, rows, and cells from any Excel spreadsheet and then paste them in your note page.

Organizing your thoughts

OneNote not only helps you organize your thoughts, it helps you rearrange them. Critical information, random ideas, diagrams, videos—you can place any information wherever you think it can help you express yourself better. Whether you’re a power user or a newcomer, OneNote makes use of multiple media to help you organize, plan, and simplify your daily life.

Here are some examples of how OneNote can help you organize your thoughts.

  • Drag text and pictures anywhere on the screen.
  • Move text and pictures to other notes and documents.
  • Capture your thoughts in bulleted lists.
  • Create folders for projects, classes, and personal files.
  • Jot down a numbered to-do list.
  • Sort and flag lecture notes to prepare for an exam.
  • Keep all of your meeting notes for a project in a single location.
  • Search through all of your notes, even the handwritten ones, to find that phone number you jotted down between appointments.
  • Create marginal notes about a document, to save and move later.
  • Plan your meals and grocery shopping.
  • Track your travel and expenses for your next vacation.
  • Draw and finalize the seating chart for your wedding.
  • Move a picture to another note, and then send it in an e-mail message to your grandmother.

Enhancing your notes

After you capture your notes, give them a professional polish with the text and picture formatting features of OneNote. OneNote also includes Spelling and AutoCorrect commands to help you create neat, accurate notes.

OneNote files are easy to share… and share again. Send your notes to other people, or open up notes for group feedback and input.

  • Share in real time. With OneNote you can collaborate with others, gathering their input for instant feedback. Here’s how to initiate a live session:
    • On the Share menu, point to Live Sharing Session, and then click Start Sharing Current Section.

You can choose to begin a new session or join one that is already in progress.

  • Send your notes in an e-mail message. Using Microsoft Office Outlook, you can send a page of your notes to others in an e-mail message.

You can also send your notes and recordings instantly to a Pocket PC or smartphone.

  • Export your notes. Convert your notes to a Microsoft Office Word document by using the Save As command, or publish your notes as a Portable Document Format (PDF) or XML Paper Specification (XPS) so you can share your notes without them being easily changed. Here’s how to do it:
  • On the File menu, click Publish as PDF or XPS.

No more crumpled sticky notes, messy notebooks, or lost doodles. Use OneNote for everything you can think of.

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Greetings from family-land! I am still vacationing – hence my spotty bloging. But, I did manage to get it together long enough to try out the new version of the Capturx pen from Adaptx. The big highlight if you are already a Capturx convert is that you can now print out paper from OneNote that can be used with the pen rather than having to use the special notebooks they provided in the past.

I’ll be writing a review of my experiences (I am a Capturx newbie) but in the meantime, I got this from Marc Pierre, Capturx’s product manager:

____________________________________

Capturx enables individuals and teams to take notes and sketch on paper with digital pens, which automatically record and integrate the handwriting into Microsoft Office OneNote. Anyone can simply write in Capturx notebooks or on ordinary printed pages with digital pens. All the information is backed up, searchable, and sharable in email or other Microsoft Office applications.

One customer of Adapx is an engineering firm whose staff record field observations and make sketches that result in volumes of data that is difficult to sort through and time consuming to key into PC’s. Their paper based data is now uploaded into OneNote where they can take advantage of sharing the information with others or even search the handwritten text.

Caputrx is also offered to office staff for use in meetings to help boost productivity which has been so successful we often get thanked for a tool that enables collaboration without being a distraction. At any time staff can reference and share notes directly from Microsoft OneNote. Office staff or field teams are now able work in a variety of locations, simply write with an easy to use pen and paper and stay focused on their jobs instead of burdensome tools.

Capturx instantly digitizes the handwriting on paper, helping to bridge paper based tools to powerful digital features in OneNote. Many of our customers found the original 5X7 notebook with waterproof pages to be helpful in field scenarios, but we also got a lot of requests for letter sized notebooks. Today we offer both letter sized 8.5X11 notebooks and unlimited print on demand of notebook pages directly from OneNote, using ordinary paper!

We are looking forward to lot’s more feedback from our customers to help with future releases.

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I have to admit it, but I  love Top 10 Lists. Today, I found a Top 8  list – which is only a little  less appealing than 10! So, here is Donovan Lange’s Top 8 list of Reasons to use OneNote.

Let’s see if we can make it a Top 20 list (much better than 10 even) – so share your reasons in the comments section.

1. OneNote allows me to put all of my little bits of information into a single place, organize them how I like, and always be able to find them instantly.

  • There’s a ton of information that doesn’t naturally have a good home otherwise.  Like the URLs I find when researching a topic, or the notes that I take during meetings.  Sure, I could use text files and notepad or post-it notes; but I’d have to create my own method for filing them into folders, navigate to the correct file to open them when I want to read them again, make sure I remember to hit Save (and give it a filename) before my laptop battery runs out and I lose my content, etc.  It really doesn’t scale when you have a lot of data.

2. It’s page surface allows me to outline, brainstorm, and collect rich forms of data better than any other tool out there.

  • Specifically, the ability to click anywhere on the page and just drag-drop any line of text to anywhere else on the page means that I can use this for random brainstorming and when writing out document outlines/drafts.  Things that don’t have linear or well-known structures.
  • Plus, there’s a million features built into the application that allows me to embed non-textual forms of information.  So I can use screen clippings (via the Windows + S key) to take a picture of something currently on my screen, or embed a full document via the included OneNote Printer or the Insert Menu, and then annotate on top of that information.  And I can find it again, since we’ll OCR the text within the pictures.
  • Even without a tablet PC, the drawing shapes and click anywhere to type means that I can create simple diagrams without having to load up Visio.  With a tablet, I can draw directly on a page, and use a pen when I’m in a meeting where typing may be viewed as distracting.
  • It works with audio as well.  We record the audio for all of our spec reviews using the built-in laptop microphone.  Any notes typed during the meeting will be synchronized into the audio timeline for later review.  And OneNote will search the speech in the audio file as well.

3. It’s really good at capturing information quickly.

  • Sometimes I need to get information written down as quickly as possible.  I don’t want to worry about making space in my word document, I can just click anywhere on the page and type.
  • Ditto for inserting tables.  Just hit tab!
  • I can launch a side-note window (which is a lot like a post-it note) from the system tray and grab down that phone number that someone just spouted off while I’m on the phone.
  • I can paste web content from a web page and it automatically includes the URL the content came from.  Huge time-saver.
  • I can apply metadata (flags) to my information or create Outlook Task items “in situ” along with the rest of the context that gives that task meaning.
  • I’m no longer restricted to keeping a single task list in Outlook.  When I’m in a meeting, or estimating a feature in OneNote I can tag a line as an Outlook Task, and it’ll create an Outlook Task for me, which is automatically kept in sync as I mark it completed, etc.  As a result, all of my ToDo items can live in the place where they’re most appropriate (like in the middle of my meeting notes, or in my shared notebook with you on a page of house projects) and yet have them rolled up appropriately in either OneNote or Outlook.

4. Outlook Integration, Outlook Integration, Outlook Integration.

  • In addition to task sync’ing, I find that there’s a ton of information that gets sent to me in email, which should live in OneNote instead.  (As email is more of a dynamic source of changing data, vs. an authored knowledge base.)  I can send an email to OneNote directly from Outlook 2007 via a single toolbar button click.  For someone who tries to keep their inbox nearly empty, being able to store messages like “how to access the internal newsgroups” (for instance) in a Notebook feels much cleaner than keeping them in my inbox
  • In addition, I can also take notes about meetings (and have it find my previous meeting notes for a recurring meeting) or keep information about people from my Contact List / GAL in OneNote directly from the Outlook meeting and contact windows.  The link between the two stays present regardless of how that gets filed in my Notebooks.

5. My stuff is available everywhere.

  • I can’t emphasize how much this rocks.  My OneNote notebook is available at work, at home, on my phone (using OneNote mobile) and on my laptop.  All I did was point OneNote at a file share or Sharepoint Site, and OneNote takes care of the rest.  Plus, it synchronizes embedded documents as well, so I don’t have to use Sharepoint to upload a document or email it to myself.  I just drag-drop it right onto the OneNote page, and voila it’s everywhere I need it!  No sync’ing, no file locking, nothing.  It just works.
  • Moreover, it works when I’m offline.  Even those embedded documents… when I pick up my laptop and go to a conference room in another building, I can still keep typing, regardless of whether or not I’ve got wireless.  Go on vacation to the beach, and make changes to my notebook.  Whenever it comes online, it all merges back in without any user interaction.

6. It allows me to collaborate with others.

  • Word track-changes?  Sharepoint edit locks?  Yuck.  OneNote is a breeze by comparison.  Think of it like a Wiki on crack.  Everyone just opens up the same Notebook (or Section or page) and just types away.  It’s magic.
  • For those without OneNote, I can create PDFs of my pages, or send a page as an email with a single click.  The person on the other end of that email doesn’t even need OneNote to view my stuff.

7. I can store sensitive information and password protect it.

  • I generally use this for my personal notebook, but I find it invaluable to store my Credit Card numbers, Bank Account Information, Website Passwords, Frequent Flyer accounts, etc. all in a section that I then password protect.  Because the bits stored on disk are encrypted, I can access that file from a server and not worry about the security of the server, across the network, etc.

8. I can automate repetitive things.

  • I keep a work journal, and find that it’s really convenient to create a stationary (templates) page which is applied automatically to all new pages created in my Journal section.  It’s such a simple idea, but saves me a ton of time.
  • Not to mention all the cool add-ins that power-users have created that extends the functionality of OneNote.

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