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Posts Tagged ‘OneNote 2010’

Here’s a review from webworkerdaily.com  of the OneNote 2010 beta as a blogging tool:

Now that Microsoft Office 2010 is in beta (as I noted here ), I’ve been spending more time using the applications, especially OneNote 2010 beta. have long used OneNote for capturing project information when I am working on one of my Windows machines, but its potential as a blogging tool has been on my mind recently. One of the features Microsoft ( GigaOM Pro company profile here ) touts I It makes a lot of sense, because OneNote can serve as an organizer for ideas, a repository for pictures and images, and has tools for composing text.

For purposes of this post, I created a fresh notebook in OneNote 2010 beta running on Windows 7. The publishing process from OneNote to your blog is straightforward. First you compose your post in OneNote and then choose “Send” from the “File” menu. Choose “Send to Blog.” If you haven’t used OneNote 2010 beta to publish to your blog previously, you’ll receive a prompt to set up a new blog account and then the New Blog Account dialog box appears.


The blogging feature supports Windows Live Spaces, Blogger, SharePoint blog, Microsoft Community Server, TypePad and WordPress. (Disclosure: Automatic, maker of WordPress, is backed by True Ventures, a venture capital firm that is an investor in the parent company of this blog, Giga Omni Media. Om Malik, founder of Giga Omni Media, is also a venture partner at True.) Follow the prompts to set up your new blog account. This is the only time you’ll have to set up your blog for publishing.

The post you composed in OneNote 2010 beta now appears in Word 2010 Beta. It can be easy to miss at first, but what you are actually seeing is Word with the “Blog Post” tab open. From this tab, you have options for publishing and inserting categories. I encourage you to test these features out prior to using them because I noticed some subtle differences between the options available for TypePad and WordPress.


When publishing to your blog, the following scary warning appears:

Whether you are comfortable with this or not, it’s certainly off-putting — I would like to know whether my password is being encrypted or not.

I was disappointed that the “Send to Blog” feature relies on MS Word for publishing my posts, because I was expecting a strictly OneNote-to-blog publishing experience. However, if you use OneNote to capture ideas and research information you may still get some mileage out of this feature. Personally, I probably won’t be using the feature on a regular basis because I think using two desktop applications just to compose and publish a blog post is a little too much, though it could be handy if I am writing posts based upon source material I already have in OneNote.

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I am sure that you have been wondering about whether everything you have created in OneNote 2007 will be compatible with OneNote 2010 –  I personally would be hosed if I had to convert all my stuff to a new format. Thankfully, this won’t be necessary as Daniel Escapa from the OneNote team points out (clearly, he has access to more functioning brain cells than I do. I wonder if he was indoors all weekend playing Halo?)

Anyway, here’s the skinny on version compatibility:

Key points:

  • OneNote 2010 will fully read & write OneNote 2007 format notebooks, no need to convert a notebook
  • There is a new OneNote 2010 format to support new features (such as versions)
  • OneNote 2010 can convert notebooks from 2007<–>2010 formats and back

OneNote 2010 will fully read & write any OneNote 2007 notebook; you do not need to convert your notebooks to use OneNote 2010. When you are on a 2007 notebook you will see that the title bar of the application says “(Compatibility Mode)” like this:

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When you see this you are in a 2007 format notebook, conversely if you do not see this then you are viewing a 2010 format notebook. Also certain features will be disabled and greyed out in the UI this is normal and to use the new features you should convert the notebook to the 2010 format

There is a new OneNote 2010 format to support new features such as:

  • OneNote Web App
  • Versions
  • Equations
  • Linked Note Taking
  • Recycle Bin
  • And more

By default when you create a new notebook in OneNote 2010 the format of the notebook will be in the 2010 format so you can use all of these new features.

If you are sharing with people who do not have OneNote you will be able to share your notes in the cloud (Windows Live) and they can view & edit those notes in the browser. If you need to work with others who have OneNote 2007 you will need to make sure the notebook is in the 2007 format.

You can convert any notebook between versions by:

  1. Right-click on the notebook on the navigation bar (on the left)
  2. Choose Properties
  3. Click to convert the notebook to whatever version you would like, see here:

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Ok, so I didn’t have to bribe, beg, borrow or steal to get this breaking information about what we can expect in OneNote 2010.

Dave Rasmussen from the OneNote team posted this yesterday:

Be sure to tell us which new features you are the most excited about in the comments area below. Personally, I can’t wait to get my hands on the full version.

OneNote 2010 Investments Overview

1. Universal Access

We repeatedly hear that access to your notes and the ability to take them anywhere is very important, whether you’re at work, home or on the go. OneNote 2007 already provides offline availability and seamless sync, and a basic OneNote application for Windows Mobile. But we knew that was just the beginning. With OneNote 2010 we’ve added:

  • Sync to Cloud (Windows Live): Your notebooks sync and are available anywhere from any machine. Of course this is in addition to all the existing ways you can sync notebooks (file shares, SharePoint, USB drives etc.)
  • OneNote Web App: You can access and edit your entire notebook from a browser. Even on a machine that doesn’t have OneNote installed.
  • OneNote Mobile: A more complete OneNote version for Windows Mobile phones. Syncs whole notebooks. Syncs directly to the cloud. No need to tether your device. Richer editing support.

Note: The above are not yet available in the Tech Preview unfortunately. We’re still finishing some integration work for sync to Windows Live.

2. Sharing and Collaboration

With OneNote 2007 we pioneered simultaneous multi-user editing of notebooks. OneNote 2007 auto-magically merges the edits, even simultaneous edits on the same page. This is valuable for single users (you can edit on desktop and laptop and not have one machine lock the file), but it’s even more valuable for  teams sharing a notebook for plans, ideas, meetings and so on. Or perhaps a family notebook shared with your significant other. We’ve heard lots of positive feedback about this, and  it has completely transformed the way many teams work and collaborate. We’ve also heard about many families that use it for sharing home renovation plans, gardening info, recipes, wedding planning and so on.

In OneNote 2010 we’ve added a number of features to make the experience of sharing with others more productive and intuitive. These include:

  • What’s new (aka Unread) highlighting: New content that someone else added or changed since you last looked at a page is highlighted so you can see what’s new on that page. Also, the notebook name, section tabs and page tabs are shown in bold so you can quickly navigate to pages with new content.
  • Author indicator: Content written by anyone other than you has a small color coded bar to the right with their initials. At a glance you can tell who wrote something.
  • Versioning: Quickly show past versions of any given page, who wrote it and when, with changes relative to previous versions highlighted.
  • Fast sync on same page: When multiple people are working on the same page we speed up the sync of that page so you can see other peoples edits in near real time.
  • We also added capabilities to be able to quickly search for recently added content (last day, week, month etc.) or get an overview of what given people changed on what days.
  • Merge two sections: This feature is more of a detail but it fits here. Sometimes people share notebooks using Live Mesh or Dropbox or other file sharing solutions. And you can end up with two forked copies of a section if you happened to make changes on two machines at once (you can read earlier posts for context, but OneNote cannot auto-magically merge simultaneous edits when working on these systems that copy files around underneath OneNote). So we’ve added the ability to manually merge any two sections if you ever get into this situation. Just tell OneNote which two sections you want merged and OneNote will take care of it.

3. Better ways to Organize and Find your Notes

Capturing, organizing and finding your information has always been at the heart of what OneNote does. We’ve made several enhancements in this core area. Some of these will be more understandable once we have detailed blog posts with screenshots.

  • Section and page tab improvements: making notebook navigation work better with a larger number of sections and pages, easier to create new sections, better page tab hierarchy visualization, collapse sub page groups, just drag left and right to create sub pages and organize your pages, insert new pages directly anywhere in your page tabs.
  • Fast “word wheel” search for navigation: the goal of this is to make search a super-fast way to get to your regularly used notes. Historically search has been more of a “last resort” feature when you couldn’t find something. We’ve completely revamped this experience so it is now designed to make it the fastest way to get to any page including pages you visit regularly like your To Do list.
  • Wiki linking: you can easily create a link to an existing page or to a new page for a topic. You can do this by just typing the Wiki link syntax (e.g. just type [[The Page Title I Want]] ), or use our new page search experience from within the link dialog. This enables you to easily create Wiki like notebooks with lots of cross links across pages.
  • Quick filing: there are many ways to send content to OneNote (Print to OneNote, send mails from Outlook, send pages from Internet Explorer and so on). Our new Quick Filing experience pops up to let you pick where in your notebook you want to send it. It remembers the last places you sent things. You can search in Quick Filing to find a specific section or page if you want it somewhere else.

4. Research and taking notes linked to documents, web pages

OneNote is often used as a companion while researching topics and collecting information (e.g. a market analysis study, a class paper, a home renovation, a car purchase and so on). This often involves looking at web pages or documents and taking notes. You could also be reviewing a document or class lecture slides and taking notes as you’re looking through them. We’ve enhanced a number of things to make this experience better.

  • Docked OneNote: you can dock OneNote to the side of your screen. It docks alongside other windows (e.g. browser, Word, PowerPoint). OneNote minimizes UI and just shows the notes page alongside your document/browser.
  • Linked Note Taking: while in this mode, OneNote automatically links the notes you take to what you’re looking at – the web page URL, the selection point in Word, the current slide in PowerPoint. Later in OneNote you can hover on that link and you’ll see a thumbnail preview of the original document, you can click on it and it will open and take you back to what you were looking at when you wrote the note.
  • Auto text wrapping: this goes well with Docked OneNote but is useful in other cases too. OneNote now wraps text outlines to fit the windows size if there is only one outline on the page. This makes it easy to see all your notes even when OneNote is docked to a relatively narrow window on the side.
  • IRM protected printouts: this is mainly for enterprise and training scenarios. The idea is that companies can distribute things like product manuals or class notes in OneNote that are protected intellectual property. The recipient can view these in OneNote and take their own personal notes on top of these materials and beside them. If for some reason the materials were viewed by an unauthorized person they would not see any of the protected material.
  • 64 bit print driver: Yes, OneNote 2010 has a new native print driver that fully supports 64 bit. It’s based on the XPS technology from Windows. It also has other virtues like better rendering quality when scaled.

5. Editing improvements

There are a number of basic editing improvements in OneNote. Below are some more prominent ones.

  • Basic styles: OneNote 2010 adds very basic styles like Heading 1,2,3. This does not have the power of Words styling features. OneNote is not designed for that level of document formatting. But it does give you a way to quickly have your meeting notes have a little structure.
  • Bullets improvements: this is a simple one but oft requested. First level bullets now indent from previous text.
  • Equations: OneNote 2010 now supports the ability to add math equations. Great for students or people who need to input math into their notebooks. OneNote will also support the ability to recognize hand written math equations and convert them when running on Windows 7.
  • Translation tooltips: OneNote can now show you a tooltip with a translation into your native language when your mouse hovers over a foreign language word. Great for language students, or if you’re working in a bi-lingual situation and need help understanding a word in a shared notebook or that you clipped from the web.

6. Touch support

With the rapidly increasing availability of touch enabled PCs and the enhanced touch experience in Windows 7, this was a natural thing for OneNote to support.

  • Finger panning and auto-switch: you can use your finger to scroll and pan around any page in OneNote. OneNote auto switches between pen, pan, and selection depending on your input device. So for example you can pan around a drawing with your left finger and draw with a tablet pen in your right hand. This makes for a very natural two handed interaction model.
  • Pinch zoom: we enabled pinch zooming within OneNote centered on the fingers.
  • Navigation controls improved for touch: we’ve made some small optimizations to make the UI easier to use with touch.

7. Fluent UI

OneNote now adopts the Fluent UI along with the other Office applications.

  • Ribbon: OneNote now has the Ribbon. We’ve designed this to optimize for the key OneNote scenarios and make them easier to use. This is also what enables us to more easily add features like math equation editing (the common controls for that use the Ribbon), and potential future features.
  • Office Backstage: This is new for Office 2010. OneNote will be taking advantage of it to make tasks like creating new notebooks, and new shared notebooks on the web easier (we’re still doing work on this).

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OK, so for those of you who don’t live in the US of A, today is labor day and we are at the end of a 3-day holiday weekend. Although, here in Seattle, most of us spent the holiday hiding from the Monsoon-like rain that has fallen pretty constantly. This was a big bummer for those of us who usually attend the annual Bumbershoot Music Festival which is largely held outdoors underneath the Space Needle at Seattle Center. I have to confess that I only made it to one of the days – Saturday. But, I did manage to catch both Katy Perry and Cheryl Crow..so, all was not lost.

So, today, i have actually been catching up on some work and found this review of the OneNote tech preview.  We haven’t spoken about the new version in a while – the beta is coming in November, so here’s a little something from Will Kelly to get you in the mood

Office2010logo

After installing the Microsoft Office 2010 Technical Preview (msft), OneNote 2010 was the first application I fired up. While OneNote grew in popularity from Office 2003 to Office 2007, the impending release of OneNote 2010 is going to offer longtime users even more to like and, quite possibly, create some new fans.

This post is going to deep dive into some of the new enhancements you will enjoy when OneNote 2010 is publicly available.

Improved Ribbon. OneNote 2010 really benefits from the ribbon improvements in Office 2010. While the introduction of the Office ribbon drew some slings and arrows from long time Office users, the Office 2010 ribbon is greatly improved and smoothes over some of those rough edges.

Tagging. While previous OneNote versions always garnered praise for usability and organization options, OneNote 2010 adds tagging to the “Home” ribbon. You have the option to tag your important notes with predefined tags or ones you create yourself. This new option really complements the already strong organizational capabilities of OneNote notebooks.

Sharing Tools. OneNote gained its popularity as a note-taking and research tool. OneNote 2010 includes sharing tools to make it an even more effective for research, including the capability to email OneNote pages, support for multiple authors sharing notebooks, and page versioning. With OneNote 2010 due to be available in more editions of Microsoft Office, both geographically dispersed and traditional project teams should be able to take advantage of OneNote collaboration.

onenote_2010_sharingtools

Improved Drawing Tools. While I am a big OneNote user, I still rely on an old school yellow legal pad and pen for taking notes in meetings. The reason is that my work as a technical writer means I do a lot of drawing of process flow diagrams and such. The OneNote 2010 drawing tools offer the drawing options I need so I can finally leave my yellow legal pad and pen behind.

onenote_2010_drawingtools

Audio Tools. While you can’t escape client meetings, you now have the option to record meetings directly into OneNote (provided your laptop has a microphone) and then search through the audio files later.

Office Integration. When I first read the news about OneNote joining the Microsoft Office suite proper, my hope was for better OneNote/Office application integration: the upcoming Office 2010 is working to deliver on it. While I try to keep my expectations simple, I am already enjoying the Linked Notes feature, which enables you to keep notes on saved documents. There is also the capability to send OneNote pages directly to Microsoft Word. I was also excited to see the capability to attach documents to OneNote pages because I can see me using it to attach drafts, research and other project artifacts to keep my projects better organized.

Final Thoughts
While the Web Component of OneNote 2010 isn’t available for review yet, I see it as an addition could directly challenge Evernote and should drive innovation in the note-taking market. Additionally, just as Microsoft is bringing Outlook to OS X, expectations are going to rise that access to Microsoft needs to make OneNote available on the Mac.

OneNote 2010 is a standout in the Office 2010 Technical Preview and I look forward to seeing the final version.

HAVE YOU TRIED THE TECH PREVIEW FOR ONENOTE YET? IF SO, WHAT DID YOU THINK?

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