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Posts Tagged ‘Sharing’

Have you signed up for the OneNote 2010 beta yet?

A first look at Microsoft OneNote 2010

If not, visit http://www.microsoft.com/2010 to download the Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus Beta.

Here to tempt you is a description of how you will be sharing Notebooks in Office 2010:

In Microsoft OneNote 2010 Beta, you can share any notebook so that you can access it on other computers or on the Web, or so that you can work in it together with other people. As a collaborative tool, OneNote offers far more than the ability to send static notebook pages via e-mail. Depending on the nature of your projects, you can use OneNote to brainstorm together with other people in meetings, use the notebook pages as a virtual whiteboard, and set up shared notebooks in which everyone can view, add, and edit information.

Unlike other programs that lock files for editing by one person at a time, OneNote 2010 lets multiple authors access a shared notebook at the same time. Anytime someone edits to the pages and sections in the shared notebook, OneNote automatically synchronizes the changes so that the notebook is always up-to-date for everyone. OneNote also maintains a separate offline copy of the notes on each user’s computer. That way, shared note-taking participants can continue to edit the notes locally even when they are temporarily disconnected from the network. The next time they connect to the shared notebook, OneNote automatically merges their changes with the changes made by everyone else.

Create a new shared notebook

  1. On the File menu, click New.
  2. Under Store Notebook On, choose where the new notebook should be stored:

    Click Web if you want to be able to use the notebook from any computer or from a Web browser. You will need to sign in or sign up for an account, after which you can control whether your notebook can be accessed only by you or also by other people.

    Click Network if you want to share the new notebook with other people on the same computer network or on a SharePoint site (for example, at your work or at your school).

  3. In the Name box, enter a descriptive title for the subject of the new notebook (for example, Team Notebook).
  4. In the Web Location or Network Location field, do one of the following:

    Specify a Web Location If the Web service is available, sign in with an existing account (such as Windows Live) or sign up for a new one. When you are signed in, you will see a list of your Web folders where you can create shared notebooks. If you don’t need to share with other people, select one of the Personal Folders. If you do need to share with others, select a Shared Folder to which others will have access. To set sharing permissions for new and existing folders, OneNote will launch your Web browser, where you can finish creating the new folder for your notebook. Return to OneNote and then refresh the folder list in the Web Location field to see the folder that you just created. Now select this folder and then proceed to Step 5 below.

    Specify a Network Location You can enter the full path of a network file share, enter a mapped network drive, or paste the full address of a SharePoint document library where you want to create the shared notebook. You can also select from one of the recent SharePoint locations, if available. Note that the notebook will be accessible to anybody who has permissions to this network location or SharePoint site.

  5. Click Create Notebook.

Share an existing notebook

  1. On the File menu, click Share.
  2. Under Select Notebook, select an existing notebook that you want to share with other people or between other computers that you will be using.
  3. Under Share On, choose where the notebook should be shared:Click Web if you want to be able to use the notebook from any computer or from a Web browser. You will need to sign in or sign up for an account, after which you can control whether your notebook can be accessed only by you or also by other people.

    Click Network if you want to share the new notebook with other people on the same computer network or on a SharePoint site (for example, at your work or at your school).

  4. In the Web Location or Network Location field, do one of the following:

    Specify a Web Location If the Web service is available, sign in with an existing account (such as Windows Live) or sign up for a new one. When you are signed in, you will see a list of your Web folders where you can create shared notebooks. If you don’t need to share with other people, select one of the Personal Folders. If you do need to share with others, select a Shared Folder to which others will have access. To set sharing permissions for new and existing folders, OneNote will launch your Web browser, where you can finish creating the new folder for your notebook. Return to OneNote and then refresh the folder list in the Web Location field to see the folder that you just created. Now select this folder and then proceed to Step 5 below.

    Specify a Network Location You can enter the full path of a network file share, enter a mapped network drive, or paste the full address of a SharePoint document library where you want to create the shared notebook. You can also select from one of the recent SharePoint locations, if available. Note that the notebook will be accessible to anybody who has permissions to this network location or SharePoint site.

  5. Click Share Notebook.

Note: If a Web or Network location that you want to use is shown as unavailable, make sure you are connected to the Internet or your network and that you have the necessary permissions before attempting to save and use notebooks in such locations.

Create an e-mail message with a link to the shared notebook for yourself or others

After you create or share a notebook, OneNote will ask you if you want to create an e-mail message with a link to the shared notebook.

If you are sharing the notebook with other people, click E-mail a Link to compose the e-mail message for your recipients. This message will include a link to the shared notebook, which recipients can click to open the shared notebook on their computer.

Note: Mail recipients who do not already have permission to access the shared notebook location will not be able to use the shared notebook. The e-mail link only points to the location; it does not provide automatic access.

If you won’t be sharing your notebook with others but you want to use it on multiple computers, you can click E-mail a Link and then send the e-mail message with the link to your own Web-based e-mail account. This way, you can easily open the shared notebook from another computer.

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I thought I’d see how lawyers can use OneNote to be even more lawyer-y. Maybe we should send a copy of OneNote to the team who will be in charge of evaluating candidates!

What is Microsoft Office OneNote for Lawyers?

Microsoft(r) Office OneNote(tm) is a note-taking software program that combines the flexibility of a legal notepad with the efficiency, organization and accessibility of a computer. Attorneys can now write, organize, reuse and share their notes on any laptop, desktop or Tablet PC.

Who Needs OneNote?

OneNote is ideal for legal practitioners — lawyers, paralegals, law clerks, legal assistants and law students — who are assigned to the same cases, are in the same practice group or work on matters that involve more than one practice group and share information. Anyone who takes notes and needs to refer to them or share them later will benefit from OneNote. It is particularly useful for those who:

· Take notes on paper or on a PC
· Do research
· Repurpose their notes to develop more formal documents or presentations
· Attend client meetings, depositions, MCLE, seminars-or virtually any note-taking forum
· Need to share their notes with others

Key Features

OneNote is indispensable to lawyers who use laptops, desktops, PDAs or Tablet PCs. Here are some of the reasons why:

· Multiple device support. OneNote works well on any desktop, laptop and Tablet PC.
· Digital ink. Lawyers can handwrite their notes or draw diagrams and pictures using a pen-input device. Handwriting can then be converted to text for use in more formal documents and facilitate sharing among attorneys.

· Flexible two-dimensional page surface. Many lawyers use symbols or personal abbreviations when taking notes. With OneNote, they can do that, draw schematics, connect lines, and even arrows, anywhere on the page — just like on a notepad. For easy team access, they can share the notes or transfer them to another application.

· Copying and pasting. Lawyers can move notes around in OneNote, or between OneNote and any other Office application — and many non-Office applications. This is especially useful for multi-office law firms whose lawyers work on the same matters from distant locations. OneNote enables everyone assigned to that matter to access the file notes in a central location. Sharing client meeting notes or litigation strategies is both time efficient and cost efficient, particularly in multidistrict litigation or for client matters being handled in different offices,

· Audiovisual notebook. Lawyers can record audio notes that sync with their typed or written notes. Rather than slog through hundreds of pages of typed deposition testimony searching for a point, attorneys can record the deposition in OneNote, flag salient testimony, immediately access and then share the exact sworn testimony with whoever needs it. The deponent can also be recorded visually with a simple plug-in, documenting body language, as well as tone of voice.

· Adding Web content. Lawyers can simply drag-and-drop pictures, diagrams, text and other information from any Web site directly into their OneNote notes. Plus, OneNote automatically includes the Web address so that the lawyer can refer to the information later, if needed.

· OneNote side note. OneNote side note is a small version of OneNote that lawyers can launch with a single click on the Windows(r) Quick Launch toolbar. It opens a small window for writing or typing notes on the go or while working in other programs.

· Dictionary. Lawyers using legal shorthand in OneNote can store the symbols in their customized dictionaries.

Additional Features

OneNote offers lawyers several helpful features that easily organize, find, reuse and share notes

that traditional notepads don’t have:

· Note flags and note flag summary. OneNote note flags help lawyers make timely decisions about what to keep and what action to take. They can be used to mark notes that are important or require follow-up, such as expert testimony or new legal issues requiring research. Flagged notes also create a list of action items that can be viewed in the summary pane and distributed simultaneously to team members.

· Finding and searching. Lawyers can quickly search and find notes they need without having to remember where they saved the information. This is critical for attorneys working on matters that extend over long periods of time, such as patent applications, or for new attorneys assigned to a case. Newcomers can easily hone in on what they need in a central folder rather than sift through someone else’s paper notes — a rather time intensive process.

· Layout and design options. Note-taking does not always follow a logical sequence. In OneNote, lawyers can drag-and-drop notes to rearrange them in a way that makes sense to them and others who need to access them.

· History navigation. Just as in a Web browser, lawyers can jump to recently-viewed note pages without sifting through legal pads or trying to recollect where the note was written.

· Page tabs. Page tabs enable lawyers to easily flip through or rearrange pages in their current notebook.
· Title area. When the notes become too long to fit on the screen at one time, the notes that a lawyer wants to remain visible can be placed in this area.

· Auto saving. Notes will never be lost again because OneNote automatically saves them as they are written. This can be critical for preserving the comments of a key witness or the elements of a client interview.

· E-mailing notes. Notes can be shared in their folders or e-mailed directly from within OneNote.
· Publish as HTML. Lawyers can publish any of their note pages as HTML.

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I’m cold and soggy. That’s all I’m saying about that.

I’ve posted a couple of times about sharing OneNote notebooks on a server – but here, for the first time, is a link to a great demo that shows you exactly how to do that.

You will learn how to use a OneNote 2007 shared notebook as your brainstorming center, and your team-members can add ideas and play off each other’s thoughts…

See more OneNote 2007 demos at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/hel… Use a OneNote 2007 shared notebook as your brainstorming center, and your team-members can add ideas and play off each other’s thoughts no matter where they are.
Category:  Howto & Style

Watch it now

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I’m cold and soggy. That’s all I’m saying about that.

I’ve posted a couple of times about sharing OneNote notebooks on a server – but here, for the first time, is a link to a great demo that shows you exactly how to do that.

You will learn how to use a OneNote 2007 shared notebook as your brainstorming center, and your team-members can add ideas and play off each other’s thoughts…

See more OneNote 2007 demos at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/hel… Use a OneNote 2007 shared notebook as your brainstorming center, and your team-members can add ideas and play off each other’s thoughts no matter where they are.
Category:  Howto & Style

Watch it now

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Here’s a bit of a mixed bag – this is an account of how an author (and SharePoint guru) used OneNote on a SharePoint site to write a book. Meaty stuff!

_______________________________________________________

One thing I realized as I started writing the book (the SharePoint 2007 Disaster Recovery Reference Guide in case you’ve missed my other posts) was that I was going to be taken a lot of notes and referring to them on a regular basis.  While taking notes with pen and paper is still something I do for my job, it doesn’t tend to happen with the volume or frequency I understood was going to be needed for this project.  For this it was going to be important for me to be able to store a lot of information from a variety of sources (such as files, notes, websites, etc) in a central location where I could categorize, annotate, and discover them easily. Luckily I’ve installed the Office 2007 Ultimate suite, which includes Microsoft OneNote 2007 (its also available as a standalone purchase or in the Office 2007 Home and Student suite).

Briefly, OneNote 2007 is described by Microsoft as “A digital notebook solution, allowing you to gather notes and information in one place.”  I’m not going to go into too much more detail about OneNote’s features, suffice it to say that it met all of my needs for the book perfectly.  I could store items, group and categorize them efficiently, and make updates and notes as I needed throughout each item. Not to mention the feature I used more than anything else in the tool: search. By the time I was done with the writing process for the book I had well over 15 sections within the OneNote notebook I created for it, and each section had anywhere from 3 to 30 or more pages within in it.  Searching through this large amount of data saved me countless hours because I could quickly find the topic or note I was covering and incorporate that information right into my chapter in Word.

The other aspect of OneNote that was perfect for my needs was how it integrates with SharePoint.  Just like the other members of the Office 2007 suite, OneNote 2007 notebooks can be uploaded into a SharePoint list as documents.  But OneNote behaves (in my opinion) just a little differently than Word or Excel when you hook it up to SharePoint. Using SharePoint with OneNote allowed me to access, read, update, and add to my notes from multiple computers without having to worry about keeping multiple versions in sync or possibly overwriting previous updates. Since I was often working on the book from different locations (at a client site over my lunch break, from my work laptop when I’d take it home, or from my personal home computer) I needed to be able to easily access my data from a central location, but didn’t want to have to deal with manually synchronizing my files or downloading new updates.  The cool thing is that OneNote 2007 does all this for you.

Here’s step-by-step instructions for setting up OneNote in SharePoint

SharePoint can be used to host OneNote Notebooks, and make sharing of information very easy for e.g. project members. The OneNote client will synchronize content with SharePoint and let end users work with OneNote Notebooks when offline.

This post will explain:

  • How to create a shared Notebook
  • How to access a shared Notebook in SharePoint
  • How is the OneNote file structure within the SharePoint document library
  • How to configure SharePoint to search OneNote 2007 content on SharePoint sites

How to create a shared Notebook

From the Share menu in OneNote, select “Create Shared Notebook”.

1. give your new notebook a name:

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2. select the option to store the notebook in a SharePoint document library:

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4. select an existing document library in SharePoint:

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5. your new notebook is now created and the sync indicator is available in the notebooks pane.

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By clicking on the sync icon, you will be able to change the sync properties for your notebook:

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How to access a shared Notebook in SharePoint

The built in security mechanism in SharePoint control who have access to a document library. As long as the user has access to the document library (and the files within the library), he can simply navigate to the document library and click to open one of the OneNote files.

The OneNote client will give the user an option to open the file or the whole Notebook:

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By selecting “Open Notebook”, the OneNote client will establish sync relations with the shared Notebook.

How is the OneNote file structure inside a SharePoint document library?

The OneNote structure is divided into Notebooks, Section, Section Group, Page and Subpage. This structure is also mirrored in the SharePoint document library.

On the left side you see the SharePoint document library, and it’s pretty similar to how OneNote is presenting the elements to the user.

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How to configure SharePoint to search OneNote 2007 content on SharePoint sites

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Hi there IheartOneNoters – sorry about the long-ish silence. I am on a family vacation in the Aspen, CO area and have been more interested in being in the great outdoors than in front of my computer. Needless to say, it is fantastically beautiful here and I am loving every minute of being in the mountains. We did get a bit of culture yesterday at the Aspen Music festival. Although, I think my Dad near had a stroke when they started playing the piece by George Crumb. Can you spell avant garde? Not quite the classical music he signed up for!

Anyway, to get my mind around all things OneNote, I thought I’d see how the members of the iheartonote facebook page use OneNote. Here goes:

I use OneNote 2007 @ work. I teach and all of the teachers on team, plus our Principal & Guidance Counselors have it installed. We keep all of our team meeting notes, behavioral plans, notes & e-mails to parents in OneNote.

This way each member of the team has access to them at all times.

During our meetings, we are actively using OneNote. When we assign tasks, etc. We do so in OneNote and it syncs with Outlook. During the week, we can check to see if the tasks have been completed and read any notes about them.

It has provided the most organized, easily accessible way to share information among so many people. I don’t know how we could accomplish so much without it!

OneNote is the most amazing software. I use it all day at work – screenshots for simplicity in explaining problems or showing someone how to do something or get somewhere – and for tasks. Absolutely <heart> OneNote!
I’m a middle school teacher at a school with a laptop program. Our teachers use OneNote to create shared notebooks on the school server. Some of our classes are semi-paperless because of OneNote. Imagine being in 7th grade and doing your math on a tablet with a OneNote notebook for math assignments!
Nick Schenk
It’s an indespensible tool for customer/project management. Using Outlook 2007 I immediately generate one notes for those important meetings where complex topics and decisions are discussed, and afterward no-one has the notes capturing what happened. I used to find the process of keeping ‘Meeting Minutes’ to be a very mundane task. Using OneNote, it’s a sinch. OneNote is the standard for all projects I run and key to team communication.

I also act as a mentor within our organization, and many of my mentoring sessions are on a monthly basis. It is very convenient to capture the career guidance topics for the mentee in OneNote and quickly refer back to the objectives and goals we set in the discussion from 30 days ago. The mentees are thankful and surprised by my ability to articulate the exact conversations we’ve had over the past month (or past year in some cases).

In personal life, I use it to organize everything from cooking recipes to honey-do lists, and medical reference articles. Heck, I even have started to use it for pasting and organizing schematics for home improvement/electronics projects around the house.

I’ve been using OneNote for school since Fall 2007.
I took notes and recorded lectures daily. I needed to brush up on my Accounting for an upcoming assessment test. It has saved me so much time finding topics for this test. Being able to search audio is so nice.
I printed PowerPoints to OneNote pages. Finding text was easy. The search capability took me to the text within the PowerPoint slide printouts in OneNote. How cool is that?!!
This is my third implementation of OneNote, second at an educational institution. Currently we are using OneNote in conjunction with a SharePoint project workspace to enhance our communication and collaboration with a group of teachers that are piloting Tablet PCs as teaching and learning tools. In using OneNote in this way, I also hope to model how these teachers may use this software with their students, from note taking, collaborative activities, to managing class/project work. So far so good.

In a previous application, I had used OneNote during data collection activities with my field teams and it worked like a charm.

One question I would like to pose to the group, is if anyone has successfully saved a shared notebook on Blackboard Vista, in the same way that it is shared using SharePoint.

OneNote is the main program used for integrative techonology at our medical school. This program in conjunction with a tablet computer equals perfection. This program has literally changed how I study. Wonderful.
Anne Lindsay

I use onenote for everything.
To keep records of my online banking and shopping (no need to print everything). Comparision shopping and big wishlists that I can share!
To “print” out craft patterns, crafting ideas and pictures – and onenote automatically records where I found that idea so I don’t “poach”
Green ideas, recipes, downloaded equipment manuals are all tracked in this versatile software.

Tell us how you use OneNote/

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I thought I’d share a post about how to use Dropbox to share OneNote Notebooks across mulitple PCs:

So…the trick is determining what to do with OneNote across the Internet.  How can you share it amongst geographically dispersed PCs?  Well, if you’re trying to share it within your organization, OneNote will allow you to collaborate across a file share or other domain-type resource (built-in functionality).  But, if you’re trying to share with a personal computer, a work computer, or a friend’s computer in Timbuktu…you need an external solution.  That solution for me was Dropbox.

Dropbox is an application that you attach to a particular folder on your PC and it will syncronize it with the web and any other PC attached to this folder.  It’s got good security, speed, and not too much overhead on your CPU.  When you make changes to file, particularly large ones, it will only push out the difference (as opposed to the entire file) – thus saving on time and bandwidth.

How do we go about connecting these two?  Below is a pretty straight-forward step-by-step for setting up OneNote to work over a Dropbox file share.  I’ve been using this between home and work for a week or so now, and it’s been great.  The beauty of it, is you can collaborate with the other person…and within a few seconds of making a change on one PC, it will be seen on the other PCs!

Step 1:  Install Dropbox on PC #1

(http://www.getdropbox.com)

Step 2:  Make sure you haveOneNote on PC #1

If not, you can download a free trial using one of the links here on http://www.iheartonenote.com

Step 3:  Open OneNote

Step 4:  Create a New Notebook

Step 5:  Name Your New Notebook

Give your new Notebook a name.  Aside from the name displayed in OneNote, this will also become a sub-folder within Dropbox.

Step 6:  Set Folder Location to a Dropbox Folder

Most Vista users will have a Path structure similar to this for Dropbox.  I’ve decided to put it in my “Private” Dropbox folder, and created a “OneNote” folder to include any and all of my OneNote Notebooks.

Step 7:  Set the Type of Sharing You’d Like to Have

My understanding is that the option I’ve chosen here allows multiple people to make changes to the Notebook simultaneously.  This is where the magic is.  Even if you have OneNote open on multiple PCs, changes on one will cause Dropbox to send updates to other machines.  When the other machines get updates, OneNote will make adjustments and display those changes on-the-fly.  It can take a few seconds, but it certainly works!  Of course, if you only use one of them at a time it will show the updates when you open at the other PC.

Step 8:  Repeat Steps #1 and #2 on your Second (Third, Fourth, etc…) PCs

Step 9:  Open the Shared Dropbox Folder on PC #2 (3, 4, etc…)

Step 10:  Start Taking Notes!

It’s really pretty much that simple!

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